hamilton pulls christian heritage transgender-protest ads from hsr bus sheltershamilton pulls christian heritage transgender-protest ads from hsr bus sheltershamilton pulls christian heritage transgender-protest ads from hsr bus shelters

by:YEROO     2019-10-08
The City of Hamilton canceled the advertisement of the Christian Heritage Party against the use of women\'s public restrooms by transgender women in bus shelters.
Former mountain federal candidate Jim Inos paid for three ads at the mountain HSR bus shelter in early August as part of a public publicity campaign.
Inos wants people to call the mayor and members of parliament to advise on a decision of April, which aims to consolidate the rights of transgender people in public facilities such as restrooms.
We believe that public policy is public information.
\"It should be open to the public for review,\" Enos said on Thursday.
Gerry Davis, general manager of public works, said that on Wednesday night, after the mayor\'s office received a complaint, city workers removed the advertisement from the bus station.
\"We don\'t think advertising is right.
Instead of reviewing advertising, Davis said, the city relies on its contractors, external media, to ensure that they comply with provincial advertising standards, the Human Rights Code and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
He added that the city has the right to veto ads that local officials find inappropriate or offensive.
Davis admits that Outfront\'s interpretation of the overall guidelines is different from that of the city.
The staff plan to follow up with the agency on Monday.
Foreign media did not respond to requests for comment.
Local transgender activist Cole ghetley said the advertisements were \"very close to violating the human rights of transgender people\" and promoted \"negative and inaccurate stereotypes about transgender people \". \"Coun.
Sam Merulla called the ads \"unfortunate \".
Merulla said, \"every group has the right to express themselves, in addition to being considered hate speech.
The ads should not reflect the city\'s commitment to inclusion, he said.
On April, the city promised to \"codify\" its commitment to municipal facilities such as safe and barrier-free use of restrooms with a formal written policy, to provide additional training to employees and to post signs when required.
The decision was made after a settlement with a transgender woman in 2014, and a security guard denied the woman access to a female toilet at the MacNab Street Bus Terminal.
She filed a lawsuit with the Ontario Court of Human Rights.
In 2012, the Ontario legislature passed the Toby act, amending the province\'s human rights code, listing gender identity and gender expression as grounds for the prohibition of discrimination.
\"Everyone has the right to enter the restroom that works for them,\" Gately said . \".
Inos believes that advertising is about women\'s rights.
\"It\'s a very fair question,\" he quoted the slogan of the advertisement, \"competing for human rights . . . . . . Where is justice?
\"Why does the right of a man who feels like a woman replace the right of a woman?
The advertisement describes a man going to a \"lady shower \".
Inos, who took part in the federal election last year, did not recognize the word \"transgender.
\"Men are not women at all times.
The most dangerous people in public restrooms are trans-sex people, especially trans-sex women, according to Gayley.
Inos believes that the problem is not so much a danger to women as a sense of \"humility \".
He added: \"The campaign is not aimed at transgender people in male restrooms.
\"Men are not so modest.
\"Inos said he had no idea what he would do now that the ad was pulled.
We paid $1,500.
He said, but he added that the campaign, which was meant to last for a month, had at least sparked discussion. Coun.
Aidan Johnson posted on Facebook a motion he planned to bring forward confirming the council\'s \"determination to avoid any such incidents in the future \".
\"I\'m sorry that these ads have gone up.
\"There is a file for Molly Hayes tmoro @ thespec. com 905-526-
3264 | @ teviahmothe City of Hamilton removed the advertisement for bus shelters placed by the Christian Heritage Party against the use of women\'s public restrooms by transgender women.
Former mountain federal candidate Jim Inos paid for three ads at the mountain HSR bus shelter in early August as part of a public publicity campaign.
Inos wants people to call the mayor and members of parliament to advise on a decision of April, which aims to consolidate the rights of transgender people in public facilities such as restrooms.
We believe that public policy is public information.
\"It should be open to the public for review,\" Enos said on Thursday.
Gerry Davis, general manager of public works, said that on Wednesday night, after the mayor\'s office received a complaint, city workers removed the advertisement from the bus station.
\"We don\'t think advertising is right.
Instead of reviewing advertising, Davis said, the city relies on its contractors, external media, to ensure that they comply with provincial advertising standards, the Human Rights Code and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
He added that the city has the right to veto ads that local officials find inappropriate or offensive.
Davis admits that Outfront\'s interpretation of the overall guidelines is different from that of the city.
The staff plan to follow up with the agency on Monday.
Foreign media did not respond to requests for comment.
Local transgender activist Cole ghetley said the advertisements were \"very close to violating the human rights of transgender people\" and promoted \"negative and inaccurate stereotypes about transgender people \". \"Coun.
Sam Merulla called the ads \"unfortunate \".
Merulla said, \"every group has the right to express themselves, in addition to being considered hate speech.
The ads should not reflect the city\'s commitment to inclusion, he said.
On April, the city promised to \"codify\" its commitment to municipal facilities such as safe and barrier-free use of restrooms with a formal written policy, to provide additional training to employees and to post signs when required.
The decision was made after a settlement with a transgender woman in 2014, and a security guard denied the woman access to a female toilet at the MacNab Street Bus Terminal.
She filed a lawsuit with the Ontario Court of Human Rights.
In 2012, the Ontario legislature passed the Toby act, amending the province\'s human rights code, listing gender identity and gender expression as grounds for the prohibition of discrimination.
\"Everyone has the right to enter the restroom that works for them,\" Gately said . \".
Inos believes that advertising is about women\'s rights.
\"It\'s a very fair question,\" he quoted the slogan of the advertisement, \"competing for human rights . . . . . . Where is justice?
\"Why does the right of a man who feels like a woman replace the right of a woman?
The advertisement describes a man going to a \"lady shower \".
Inos, who took part in the federal election last year, did not recognize the word \"transgender.
\"Men are not women at all times.
The most dangerous people in public restrooms are trans-sex people, especially trans-sex women, according to Gayley.
Inos believes that the problem is not so much a danger to women as a sense of \"humility \".
He added: \"The campaign is not aimed at transgender people in male restrooms.
\"Men are not so modest.
\"Inos said he had no idea what he would do now that the ad was pulled.
We paid $1,500.
He said, but he added that the campaign, which was meant to last for a month, had at least sparked discussion. Coun.
Aidan Johnson posted on Facebook a motion he planned to bring forward confirming the council\'s \"determination to avoid any such incidents in the future \".
\"I\'m sorry that these ads have gone up.
\"There is a file for Molly Hayes tmoro @ thespec. com 905-526-
3264 | @ teviahmothe City of Hamilton removed the advertisement for bus shelters placed by the Christian Heritage Party against the use of women\'s public restrooms by transgender women.
Former mountain federal candidate Jim Inos paid for three ads at the mountain HSR bus shelter in early August as part of a public publicity campaign.
Inos wants people to call the mayor and members of parliament to advise on a decision of April, which aims to consolidate the rights of transgender people in public facilities such as restrooms.
We believe that public policy is public information.
\"It should be open to the public for review,\" Enos said on Thursday.
Gerry Davis, general manager of public works, said that on Wednesday night, after the mayor\'s office received a complaint, city workers removed the advertisement from the bus station.
\"We don\'t think advertising is right.
Instead of reviewing advertising, Davis said, the city relies on its contractors, external media, to ensure that they comply with provincial advertising standards, the Human Rights Code and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
He added that the city has the right to veto ads that local officials find inappropriate or offensive.
Davis admits that Outfront\'s interpretation of the overall guidelines is different from that of the city.
The staff plan to follow up with the agency on Monday.
Foreign media did not respond to requests for comment.
Local transgender activist Cole ghetley said the advertisements were \"very close to violating the human rights of transgender people\" and promoted \"negative and inaccurate stereotypes about transgender people \". \"Coun.
Sam Merulla called the ads \"unfortunate \".
Merulla said, \"every group has the right to express themselves, in addition to being considered hate speech.
The ads should not reflect the city\'s commitment to inclusion, he said.
On April, the city promised to \"codify\" its commitment to municipal facilities such as safe and barrier-free use of restrooms with a formal written policy, to provide additional training to employees and to post signs when required.
The decision was made after a settlement with a transgender woman in 2014, and a security guard denied the woman access to a female toilet at the MacNab Street Bus Terminal.
She filed a lawsuit with the Ontario Court of Human Rights.
In 2012, the Ontario legislature passed the Toby act, amending the province\'s human rights code, listing gender identity and gender expression as grounds for the prohibition of discrimination.
\"Everyone has the right to enter the restroom that works for them,\" Gately said . \".
Inos believes that advertising is about women\'s rights.
\"It\'s a very fair question,\" he quoted the slogan of the advertisement, \"competing for human rights . . . . . . Where is justice?
\"Why does the right of a man who feels like a woman replace the right of a woman?
The advertisement describes a man going to a \"lady shower \".
Inos, who took part in the federal election last year, did not recognize the word \"transgender.
\"Men are not women at all times.
The most dangerous people in public restrooms are trans-sex people, especially trans-sex women, according to Gayley.
Inos believes that the problem is not so much a danger to women as a sense of \"humility \".
He added: \"The campaign is not aimed at transgender people in male restrooms.
\"Men are not so modest.
\"Inos said he had no idea what he would do now that the ad was pulled.
We paid $1,500.
He said, but he added that the campaign, which was meant to last for a month, had at least sparked discussion. Coun.
Aidan Johnson posted on Facebook a motion he planned to bring forward confirming the council\'s \"determination to avoid any such incidents in the future \".
\"I\'m sorry that these ads have gone up.
\"There is a file for Molly Hayes tmoro @ thespec. com 905-526-
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